Electrostatics in Middle-School – Part 3: Early Electrical Knowledge in the Classroom

Read the previous parts if you haven’t: Part 1 Part 2

In the previous article, I briefly introduced the major developments in the knowledge of electricity up to the first half of the 17th century. So, what lessons and activities for the classroom can be designed based on this?

I intend to describe one possible approach here. I leave it to the creativity and imagination of readers who may be teachers to think of better ways. I hope you’ll come back and share your ideas in the comments if you get inspired by this and come up with other ideas to try out!

From plastic ruler to amber

Every student would invariably have rubbed a plastic ruler on hair and observed tiny paper bits flying towards it. I would tell my students that people in ancient Greece had done the same thing with amber, as a starting point for the narrative. Although amber itself is a rare and expensive material and difficult to come by, some students would have read about it and would be eager to share with the class what they knew about it.

Is it magnetism?

It might seem like a trivial thing, but asking students whether they think that this attraction happens due to magnetism is a good way to get them warmed up for scientific inquiry. The students will be forced to articulate why the attracting power of the rubbed plastic ruler cannot be magnetism. And if you’re lucky, you may even have one student in class who asserts that it is magnetism and states her reasons — then it won’t be a trivial discussion any more!

Depending on how the debate unfolds, there may be opportunities to get the students to design simple experiments to check if a rubbed plastic ruler has any properties of a magnet.

  • Does a rubbed plastic ruler have poles? Are the paper bits attracted more strongly to the ends as in the case of iron pieces to a magnet?
  • Does the rubbed plastic ruler have any directionality? Does it align in the north-south direction if suspended by a thread?

Which other materials become attracting when rubbed?

The students can then repeat William Gilbert’s experiments to find out which materials around them get this attracting power when rubbed. I would get the students to make their own simple versorium by hanging a pencil from their desks with a thread. They would then pick up every substance they could find around them and check whether they can make the versorium rotate when rubbed. Some students might start exploring the question of whether the material used for rubbing matters.

Gilbert’s versorium
(Image: Public domain)

This activity is great fun, but it also quickly reveals the difficulties and limitations of scientific inquiry in the classroom. What the students will learn from the activity depends a lot on what materials they have with them to test with the versorium.

Ideally there would be several materials that are electrics and several that are non-electrics. However, this is not so easy in practice. Apart from most plastics like polythene, PVC, etc. there aren’t too many common materials that easily become charged on rubbing. In very dry weather, you can succeed in charging candle wax, a rubber eraser and sometimes paper — enough to detect with a versorium.

One question I was faced with was whether I should choose the set of materials I wanted the students to experiment with. I could make sure that there were different kinds of electrics and non-electrics in the set. But wasn’t that cheating? Wasn’t that in a way pre-determining what the students would “discover”? Could I even say that the students were “discovering” anything?

This is a complex question and I’ll share my thoughts on it in a later post. Here, it would suffice to say that in such situations, I’ve almost always tilted towards a pre-determined outcome — mostly due to my own personal discomfort with not knowing how a class will unfold!

Attraction and repulsion

One last experiment that can be done by the students based on this part of the story is on electrical repulsion. This can be demonstrated the first time, in case the students do not stumble upon this phenomenon on their own in the limited time they have.

It is actually the same experiment with the plastic ruler, but using small bits of aluminium foil instead of paper. With bits of aluminium foil, repulsion happens in a far more noticeable way when the pieces hit the ruler. Sometimes you can even get a foil piece to dance up and down between the ruler and the table!

Students can be asked to form their own hypotheses about why the aluminium foil pieces sometimes rebounded.

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